Choo Choo Chuesday

Today is Tuesday Travel day (but not for you or anyone else on this planet right now), and today’s mode of travel is TRAINS. My granddad loved trains, often joining the engineer up front, donning the requisite engineer cap. While most of his train schedules and pamphlets are normal map-sized (the kind we once bought at gas stations), none of today’s images are larger than your hand. Most measure only five inches tall.

The majority are from 1934-1935, but this one is about to hit the century mark.

Folks back then would have needed a good pair of glasses to read the small font to find a route and a fare to their destination.

Advertising air conditioning was very important.

Even if was glaringly racist.

It certainly sounds necessary, after reading about the “torrid, sooty blasts from open windows.”

The font and artwork are still eye-catching after all these years.

The luncheon options, however, would not fare so well today. Ox tongue? Prune whip? Prune cornbread? What on earth?

Perhaps you’d be better served by keeping your appetite until you hit the Fred Harvey counter at Union Station (where Harvey Girls served up lunch). Fred Harvey advertisements were ubiquitous on time cards.

Why, even Judy Garland was a Harvey Girl in the movies!

And she sang about the Atchison, Topeka and the Santa Fe, which were all train routes.

What about you all? Have you ever ridden a train? Did you get a cool time card? Where were you going?

 

Welcoming Third Reich Touts Beautiful Country

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yep, it’s grandpa’s map time again. This time, it’s Germany! The last referenced date on it is ’33. Hitler has just become chancellor, he’s begun his purge of the civil service, professing national socialism. The Gestapo is born, and Germany is ripe for visitors!

It’s so hard to appreciate a large map online, especially one that has been folded since the 30s, with stiff, sharp creases. 

But you can get a taste of the fanciful and intricate illustrations. Here we see it referred to as the German Reich, though this is the first year of the rise of the Third Reich.

None of its citizens can know what the next few years will bring, or how their children will become indoctrinated.

Can you appreciate the colors, the birds, the animals, and churches? What a happy place of frolic.

By the way, friends and family who have lived in and visited Germany say it is a beautiful country today! Add it to your bucket list.

Easter Crucifix Hairdos Offer Form Over Function

Nat Geo 1931 by Wilson and MacKinnon

I know what you’re thinking.

#extra

In fairness, these Aborigines were all gussied up for the corroborree (lively social gathering), where they had plans to perform a “wild duck dance” wearing said grass and feather head ornaments.

They don’t look too thrilled about the pending festivities. Personally, I wouldn’t chance the neck pain or misalignment of the spine that such weight could cause. And that’s why I don’t get invited to corroborrees.

Second Byrd Antarctic Expedition

Among my granddad’s things is this gloriously colorful 24 x 18 map. My guess is that Gramps mailed his request to General Foods, as Grape-Nuts was one of the foods Byrd took on his journey.

Per curtiswrightmaps.com,

It depicts Antarctica from a polar perspective, with the tip of South America visible at the very top of the image. Large areas are labeled as unexplored, inaccessible, or “claimed.” Inset maps of Byrd’s route south and the area near his camp are provided to the audience as a helpful aid. As explained in the decorative title cartouche, Byrd’s second expedition was the first to feature live two way radio broadcasts. A radio station sponsored by CBS was set up on the base camp ship and relayed weekly updates to New York via Buenos Aires.

Below, you can see the copyright of 1934. One wonders if, at age 14, Gramps ever put this on his wall. It does not appear so. Or has it simply sat inside this envelope for 86 years, going from house to house each time he moved, packed away in a box and never tossed away?

Proper Pawmenship

Among my granddad’s endless child-of-the-Depression-era keepsakes (honestly, I should start a blog just called THAT, since it could last into the next century), was this signed (pawmenship, not penmanship) image of Rin Tin Tin himself. Does he look focused or forlorn? They really should have posed him looking up. In any event, he died the next year in 1932. Other RTT’s succeeded him, but he was the legit and only German Shepherd rescued from a World War I battlefield.

Far be it for KenL-Ration not to send advertising and pimp their products to young kids (like my gramps) who sent off for them. After all, it’s what Rin Tin Tin ate.

Let’s Get This Fresh Hell Over With

Southerners by Kuralt

This image of a Kentucky Red Cross dental clinic in 1932 is particularly loathsome to me lately, as I had a crown put in nearly two weeks ago, and the pain remains excruciating. Who knew that even after decades of wearing a nightguard, the pressure of clenching could still fracture your teeth, and they would need crowns whose out of pocket cost was exactly the cost of your first TWO automobiles?

Stop The Cough With OG Tussin

Cactus 1938

Bottles of syrupus tolu and menthol tussin play a role in stopping the cough. While you wait, roam around the drug store and peruse its wares.

Soon the pharmacist will call your name, and you’ll pay a hefty copay. Hopefully it will do the trick.

giphy.com

Stride Rite

Crossing campus can be a tricky affair.

UT ’33

Social circles cross, and conversations must be had.

What’s the tea for ’33?

The old chap on the far left appears to be escaped British royalty, perhaps setting the precedent for Harry and Meghan.

So many sights to see!

Such sweet smiles on the faces of youth as they head into their future.

Oh, The Places You’ll Go!

The 1933 Retama yearbook is full of travel-related illustrations, encouraging its students to make use of modern transportation.

Even the yearbook cover is a wonderful map itself. I especially like the windblower!

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