1960s, Culture, Fashion, Funny, History, Humor, Nostalgia, Photography, Pics, Style, Vintage

Not These Kind Of Masks

Nat Geo 3/69

I’ve never worn a mask like this. I’ve never been in a temperature that was a single degree. The folks in this pic are sitting (voluntarily) outside, in thirteen degrees below zero. Now I know many of you Yankees (that’s everyone above the Mason-Dixon line to me) and Canadians will scoff and wave your hands. “Oh, that’s NOTHING!” Well, it sounds horrendous. But football fans are die-hard, and this couple was among 50,000 other crazy fools.

It was the FIRST NFL game ever played in subzero weather. New Year’s Eve, 1967, Green Bay’s Lambeau Field, kicking off to the Dallas Cowboys. And while the Packers scored a victory, the fans may have proven a bit too rowdy. RIP, goal post.

1950s, Culture, Fun, History, Nostalgia, Photography, Pics, Vintage, Youth

Together, But Six Feet Apart

Time Life “The Good Old Days”

Kiddos swing their hips at New Jersey’s Brookside Swim Club during the 1950s, while moms look on. With a club record of 3000 spins (who was counting?), a 10-year-old boy claimed victory. I bet most of them didn’t last two minutes.

Spin while you can, son. Vertigo sets in as you age, at least in my case. Unless of course, the hoop is an onion ring. But then you get your cardigan and khakis all oily.

giphy.com
1940s, College, History, Nostalgia, Photography, Pics, Vintage

Taking Linwood Sexton Down

Jayhawker XMas ’46

During the 1946 football season, it took five KU Jayhawks to bring down down Wichita “Wheatshockers'” Linwood Sexton. However, the final score was Kansas 14, Wichita 7. Sexton, one of the first African-Americans to play for Wichita State, went on to play halfback for the Los Angeles Dons. A member of the Kansas Sports Hall of Fame, he passed at the age of 90.

Below he is pictured in 2008 with son, Eric, in front of a mural at Koch Arena.

photo: The Wichita Eagle
1930s, History, Nostalgia, Photography, Pics, Vintage

Hurtling O’er The Hill

The Minneapolis Journal, Glenwood Park

Back before climate change, we had winter, and folks use to ski in water that would freeze and make snow. People used gravity to ski from the top of the snow to the bottom of it. Sometimes they snapped their shins or skied right into a tree and died, but other times, they caught the wind under their skis and soared, ever briefly, high above the crowds, catching the cold crisp air beneath their feet, alighting upon the soft snowy incline and gliding to the stretch.

1960s, College, Culture

Nicotine Responsible For Decreased Fan Support

1961 Round-Up

Perhaps it’s the combination of shades and smokes that makes these fellows look too cool for school–too cool to jump up and down anyway. Methinks they don’t want to look overly enthusiastic and wind up looking like Mr. Plaid down below, who appears to be uneasy in applause. Perhaps he has tender palms?

And then there’s the other end of the spectrum. Fans who come out to support the team, rain or shine, not afraid to look excited.

And the cheerleaders sure appreciate it!

1949 Cactus
1920s, Celebrities

You Know It’s You, Babe

Corbis-Bettmann, The Century

During the Roaring 20’s, no ball player beat the popularity of George Herman Ruth, Jr. Born in 1895 in the Pigtown section of Baltimore, Maryland, he reached his greatest fame as a slugging outfielder for the New York Yankees. That’s Babe in the boater hat.

And in case you need a refresher course on hats from 100 years ago, here ye be:

Pinterest

Note that there is a porkpie hat, and this post is about Babe (also a pig’s name), who was born in the Pigtown section. And also he was a bit of a porker.

Women of all ages adored him as well.

http://www.todayifoundout.com

Especially those in flapper hats.

Pinterest

He had many nicknames during his all-star years:

And he never forgot his fans.

http://www.oldsportscards.com