When You’re SERIOUS About Christmas Cards

LIFE: Our Finest Hour

Actually, this woman was a draft service worker during WWII. Men 18-65 and were required to register and keep the card on them at all times. Men age 18-45 were subject to military service. From 1940 until 1947 – when the wartime selective service act expired – over 10,000,000 men were inducted.

(c) Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association, Deerfield MA.

This cartoon in the Saturday Evening Post depicted a draft board scraping the bottom of the barrel.

Mischa Richter; February 19, 1944

A Very Good Find In A Very Tough Year

Life: Our Finest Hour

During WWII, the not-yet-vanquished German army occupied the north of France, including the port of Cherbourg, which they heavily fortified against seaborne assault. As the only deep water port in the region, it was particularly desirable, so American troops encircled the city in June of 1944 in the Battle of Cherbourg, and handed the Germans their asses five days later, when they surrendered. The fighting left the city in a compromised state. However, in only a month, cargo ships known as Liberty Ships began to arrive, and it became the busiest port in the entire world, with twice the traffic of New York, until the war ended. It has since merged with an adjacent city to become Cherbourg-Octeville.* In this image, we see American soldiers in Cherbourg who appear to have stumbled upon some German wine stores. I’ll drink to that.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*per wikipedia

 

Christmas Day 1943 On Guadalcanal

Life: Our Finest Hour

Christmas Day didn’t feel very wintry to these WWII soldiers in the South Pacific. Santa braved the 90 degrees to dispense Red Cross gifts to Army and Marine hospitals and bring some holiday cheer to those missing their families back home.

A Little Fall Of Rain

Afternoon Rain, San Francisco, CA, 2017 by Mike Spector

I had to toss my son’s long, pointed umbrella last night, as it finally gave up the ghost. The white plastic pieces on the shaft had gone brittle and cracked. It must have been 20 years old, and it took up several feet of space, not having been invented during the collapsible, compact years.

quora.com

They mustn’t make them like that anymore, as our newer, smaller umbrella ribs can’t seem to last longer than a set of tires, and they certainly snap in a solid wind.

iStock

However, we live in Texas, where it rains as many fingers as I have per year. It’s enough to make us want to run out and dance in it–and we have! But never to this extent.

Pinterest

When You Appreciate The Majesty Of Nature But Also You’re Super Hungry

Bolatbek, Eagle Hunter, Mongolia, 2017 by Oliver Klink

Okay, yes, that Mongolian is an eagle hunter. But he’s not eating the eagle; he’s using it to hunt. Deer hunters hunt and eat deer, but eagle hunters use the eagle prowess in a self-serving manner and consequently keep the eagle alive. They train the eagles to catch small animals such as foxes and hares, whose furry coats eagles can easily spot in the snow. Then the trainer eats them. You see? It’s all about the hierarchy of which animals we like. Is it okay to kill tuna to eat sandwiches? Absolutely. Is it okay if we accidentally kill a dolphin while we’re in the middle of murdering tuna? No way, Jose. It’s about which animals matter.

Obviously, in America, eagles are emblematic of our country. We do not train them, and instead use hawks in falconry. We do not touch them, or their nests, or their eggs, as this is prohibited in the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act. Though the bald eagle was removed from the endangered species list in 2007, we continue to protect them as the symbol of our country. And we are certainly not alone in loving eagles. Mexico has a golden eagle on its flag, with a serpent in its talons, mid-murder. If that’s not badass, I don’t know what is.

Anley flag

And lest you think the mere association with eagles is not powerful, remember that The Eagles hold both the #1 and #3 spots of best-selling albums of all time (per http://www.mentalfloss.com). And that’s why we don’t stab eagles with steely knives.

 

Miss Landmine Cambodia 2009

Nat Geo 1/2012

I don’t get this at all.

Here we see pageant organizer Morten Traavik helping winner Dos Sopheap with her prize (a titanium leg to replace the one blown to smithereens), which she decided was too uncomfortable to actually utilize. Her fame, however, brought her college sponsorship. Norwegian filmmaker Traavik claimed the pageants “challenge the conventional concepts of beauty” and allow these women opportunities to feel pride as well as earn income. I suppose it’s a not-so-classic case of making lemonade from lemons, but it’s a hard issue to address.