Oh, The Places You’ll Go!

The 1933 Retama yearbook is full of travel-related illustrations, encouraging its students to make use of modern transportation.

Even the yearbook cover is a wonderful map itself. I especially like the windblower!

Orange You Glad You’re Not A Wicker-Weaver?

Famagustan orange baskets make their way to Livadhia, where hopefully, a wicker market exists.

Nat Geo July 1928

Main Street has yet to be paved, and the donkeys tire easily.

The goats, however, are doing just fine, thank you very much.

If oranges prove to be in short supply in Livadhia, the baskets can be used for other things.

What could go wrong?

Step By Step To Sunrise

I was up at 5:45am Sunday morning. It was still dark outside, and I tried to go back to sleep, but to no avail. It was the first morning at our Hot Springs, Arkansas VRBO rental, and I wanted to see the sunrise. I pulled a jacket over my pajamas and headed down the back steps to catch the first rays of sun peek out through the tall pine trees.

The rest of the family was still snug in their beds, but I got to enjoy the majesty of the dawn.

The sunlight lit up the mist on the lake, and I watched the ducks glide by.

We were still in the shade, but the sun hit just beyond the neighbor’s dock.

Then it lit up the shore like a fire.

And the whole neighborhood turned golden.

The Price Of A Tall Starbucks Iced Coffee

Only at Starbucks does “tall” actually mean “small” these days. But that’s beside the point. What we have here is a local money trader on the Brazil side of the Venezuela-Brazil border (Brazil has borders with TEN countries). He’s counting out five million Venezuelan bolivares, which is the equivalent of just under $2.50–or enough to grab this mostly -ice overpriced drink at Starbucks.

Nat Geo 11/18

Can you imagine handing over that stack of cash just for a drink that’s not even refillable? Good Lord. Crafty artists have decided to use the currency as a medium, making dogs out of the money and selling them on etsy for $65.

etsy

Gas Envy

1935 Texaco ad

In 1932, Texaco introduced Fire Chief gasoline to the nation, a “super-octane” motor fuel touted, as you can see above, as “surpassing specifications” for ¬†emergency vehicles. Ed Wynn promoted it on his NBC radio program called the Texaco Fire Chief.

Amazon

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