1930s, Advertising, Culture, Fun, History, Nostalgia, Pics, Travel, Vintage

Vertical Vacations

Back in 1937, TikTok didn’t demand five hours of each day, so folks would actually sit and read a 44 page article about a foreign country in National Geographic. The folks at Nat Geo knew their fascinating photos and clever captions would wet the whistle of those with the traveling bug, so travel ads were placed in portrait style near the end of the magazine.

This first ad designated certain activities for different ages, like remodeling a colonial cottage, an easy task for a 100-year-old to tackle.

images from National Geographic, March 1937

Other ads designated the means of travel, like this one for Oregon highways. Why not drive? Gas was cheap, and you were probably about to be evicted due to the high unemployment during the Depression. Hit the road, Jack!

Other ads just plain scared the tar out of you with images of Irvin Cobb’s unfortunate countenance.

Who wouldn’t want to angle or loaf or tramp in Canada? It’s where they film all the Hallmark movies. And as long as you’re already up north, might as well hop aboard a nine day Alaskan cruise, for just under $100. You might see indigenous peoples wearing blankets and holding indigenous art. They may or may not come in peace.

Alaska not your cup of tea? Well, 1937 is a great time to tour Germany. Hurry, before war breaks out. At that point, they may not offer so much Gemütlichkeit, or good cheer, for which they’re famous.

Need more neutral surroundings? Nothing like a travel ad to seduce you with the devaluation of the franc, and how much more you can buy with your boss US dollars. Think about it: reduced rail fares, no visas, no “money formalities,” no vax card. Don’t overthink it; just go.

Perhaps neither cruise, plane, nor Oregon highway tantalizes. Then all aboard the Milwaukee Road Hiawatha (fun word alert), headed toward the unspoiled Northwest.

Take in the “sea-girt” peninsula. That means surrounded by sea. Feel free to use that word later today. I can think of lots of things that the Northwest is surrounded by, especially in the inner cities. But not in 1937! So there you go, folks. Do you think any of these ads would have enticed you if you had been alive then? Which one beckons most?

1920s, 1930s, Advertising, Art, Culture, Fun, History, Nostalgia, Travel, Vintage

Choo Choo Chuesday

Today is Tuesday Travel day (but not for you or anyone else on this planet right now), and today’s mode of travel is TRAINS. My granddad loved trains, often joining the engineer up front, donning the requisite engineer cap. While most of his train schedules and pamphlets are normal map-sized (the kind we once bought at gas stations), none of today’s images are larger than your hand. Most measure only five inches tall.

The majority are from 1934-1935, but this one is about to hit the century mark.

Folks back then would have needed a good pair of glasses to read the small font to find a route and a fare to their destination.

Advertising air conditioning was very important.

Even if was glaringly racist.

It certainly sounds necessary, after reading about the “torrid, sooty blasts from open windows.”

The font and artwork are still eye-catching after all these years.

The luncheon options, however, would not fare so well today. Ox tongue? Prune whip? Prune cornbread? What on earth?

Perhaps you’d be better served by keeping your appetite until you hit the Fred Harvey counter at Union Station (where Harvey Girls served up lunch). Fred Harvey advertisements were ubiquitous on time cards.

Why, even Judy Garland was a Harvey Girl in the movies!

And she sang about the Atchison, Topeka and the Santa Fe, which were all train routes.

What about you all? Have you ever ridden a train? Did you get a cool time card? Where were you going?

 

1940s, Advertising, Art, Fun, Humor, Nostalgia, Travel, Vintage

Meeting The Ex-Girlfriend

1946
1946

Here we see Cary Grantish introducing his new girlfriend in red (who may have either scoliosis or some sort of pelvic trauma causing that posture) to his former flame, Lana Turnerish, in purple. Lana asks, “Oh, is that where you met? How interesting.”

Cary, in his oblivion, doesn’t think there’s cause for cattiness, since that relationship ended over a decade ago, but that doesn’t stop Green Striped Hat from sizing up his current squeeze.

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But the real flirtation is with these two. They’re obviously not married; no wife would beam at her man like that (unless she’s Nancy Reagan). No, this gal is setting a snare. lifeaug19-49024

All aboard a Pullman!

History, Nostalgia, Photography, Pics, Vintage

Civil War Bridge On The Pamunkey

US Signal Corps Photo (Brady Collection) in National Archives
US Signal Corps Photo (Brady Collection) in National Archives

In The American Heritage History of American Railroads by Jensen, this 1862 image shows a bridge under construction. Major General George McClellan of the Union Army brought locomotives and cars by ship from Baltimore and ran trains as close to four miles to the Confederate capital. The workmen are seated, and to the left is a photographer’s field darkroom. At that time, photographs had to be developed immediately and while wet.

To their left , a locomotive was arriving on a ship in White House Landing on the Pamunkey River.

railroadsinamerica016

Here is another image of the field darkroom, invented by Matthew Brady.

http://www.sonofthesouth.net/
http://www.sonofthesouth.net/

The wagon would carry the chemicals, glass plates, and finished negatives. Can you imagine what would have happened if the horses got startled or took off at a gallop?

Food, Fun, History, Nostalgia, Photography, Pics, Vintage

Grilled Lean Bison Burger

Railroads in America by Jensen
Railroads in America by Jensen

The Kansas-Pacific Railway promoted buffalo-hunting parties back in 1870. Outside the railroad’s general offices, a taxidermist displays his work.

railroadsinambericabuffalo

Don’t worry; they’re off the endangered species list. The population is stable and you can enjoy a nice sammich, should you so desire.

Slater's 50/50 bison burger in Huntington Beach, CA
Slater’s 50/50 bison burger in Huntington Beach, CA

The OC Weekly raves:

The tangy stack features seasoned ground bison (aka the American buffalo) nestled on a bed of shredded celery and carrots. All that’s topped buffalo sauce-infused sharp cheddar cheese, grilled onions and jalapeños, and then smothered with housemade buttermilk ranch and Frank’s RedHot dressing.

Who could resist?

1940s, Advertising, Art, History, Nature, Nostalgia, Photography, Pics, Travel, Vintage

Your America

colorado

UnionPacific (3)

Yesterday we profiled New York Central railroad advertising, and today we focus on the Union Pacific. Again, these are all WWII era, as evidenced by the optimism above: “After victory…”

Montana shows us stout cows and wide open spaces.

Montana UnionPacific (2)

The Nebraska one has an interesting choice of colors for the sky. nebraska UnionPacific (1)

California has ordered groves and fresh citrus. california UnionPacific (4)

What a great ad campaign. I can’t decide which of the four is my favorite. Which do you enjoy?