I Just Want To Bang On The Drum All Day

Check out these squirts, circa WWII, conducting a “lively aluminum salvage campaign” out of pots from their neighbors on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. A grumpy bearded gramps doesn’t seem nearly as thrilled about the pursuit as the youth, but I think that’s just the face old folks make.

When You’re SERIOUS About Christmas Cards

LIFE: Our Finest Hour

Actually, this woman was a draft service worker during WWII. Men 18-65 and were required to register and keep the card on them at all times. Men age 18-45 were subject to military service. From 1940 until 1947 – when the wartime selective service act expired – over 10,000,000 men were inducted.

(c) Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association, Deerfield MA.

This cartoon in the Saturday Evening Post depicted a draft board scraping the bottom of the barrel.

Mischa Richter; February 19, 1944

A Very Good Find In A Very Tough Year

Life: Our Finest Hour

During WWII, the not-yet-vanquished German army occupied the north of France, including the port of Cherbourg, which they heavily fortified against seaborne assault. As the only deep water port in the region, it was particularly desirable, so American troops encircled the city in June of 1944 in the Battle of Cherbourg, and handed the Germans their asses five days later, when they surrendered. The fighting left the city in a compromised state. However, in only a month, cargo ships known as Liberty Ships began to arrive, and it became the busiest port in the entire world, with twice the traffic of New York, until the war ended. It has since merged with an adjacent city to become Cherbourg-Octeville.* In this image, we see American soldiers in Cherbourg who appear to have stumbled upon some German wine stores. I’ll drink to that.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*per wikipedia

 

Christmas Day 1943 On Guadalcanal

Life: Our Finest Hour

Christmas Day didn’t feel very wintry to these WWII soldiers in the South Pacific. Santa braved the 90 degrees to dispense Red Cross gifts to Army and Marine hospitals and bring some holiday cheer to those missing their families back home.

New North

Nat Geo Aug ’47

Back when this photo was taken in the summer of 1947, Penasse, Minnesota was the most northerly post office in the US. Nowadays, it’s Barrow, Alaska. I’m pretty sure we’re done acquiring new states, so Barrow will probably retain the title.

The manĀ  who looks like The Skipper from “Gilligan’s Island” is actually Captain Young, a veteran skipper of the mailboat Resolute (not the S.S. Minnow), which had just arrived on the 50-acre island from Warroad, just shy of Canada. The poor-postured woman with her pelvis tucked beneath her is postmistress Mrs. Fran Cole. The two men beside her, one of which appears to be leering menacingly, are Chippewa Indian fishing guides for summer visitors.