Food, Fun, Nature, Photography, Pics, Texas

Folks Should Call Me Miss Figgy At This Point

As some of you know, our fig tree (a cutting from my husband’s grandfather’s tree many moons ago) flaunts her fecundity each June, and then promptly closes shop within the month. This year, she held on to her small green figs until the very end of June, when they plumped up all purple and big as softballs, in some cases.

As soon as you twist one off a branch, a sticky milk spurts out, and it’s quite itchy. Even three rounds of vigorous Soft Soap won’t make it go entirely away. Nature’s weapon.

This was Thursday morning’s haul.

I’m always surprised by how few people have ever eaten a ripe fig, but it makes sense, since you never see them in the stores. They die after 48 hours, so you have to eat them quickly. As neither my son nor my spouse are fans, I have had to force myself to eat 3-5 figs daily, just to fulfill the chintzy gal inside me, who cannot pass up free food. Plus, it’s healthy!

Sometimes I have to add them to a salad, so I don’t get so bored.

I gave a bushel to a Facebook friend, who sees me post them daily, and tried to offer some to the new Asian family across the street, but he thought I was asking him to come trim my tree. Eventually, I spoke with the wife, who was happy to try some, and I packed a dozen in a to-go box for them. Another 10 were given next door to our Indian neighbors, who thought at first we were offering “pigs”  last year. They said they didn’t eat meat and politely declined. But once we got past the consonant confusion, they were down with a pile of figs.

Lastly, the neighbors behind us actually can see the purple orbs as they hover on branches above our fence. We told them to snag whatever they like, since the abundance is overwhelming, and I packed up another box for them and passed it over. It will be 107 today, and zero chance of rain, as usual, so I don’t know how long this tree will keep pumping them out. But until then, I’ll keep reaching for the figs (except the top branches; those are for the birds and squirrels).

 

1940s, College, History, Humor, Nostalgia, Photography, Pics, Texas, Vintage

Kryptonite Used In ‘Rona Vaccine Trial

all images 1943 Cactus

That’s probably not kryptonite. In fact, the only thing I recognize in the whole image is dreft, and a man in an apron. A sturdy apron. The rest of it is all science.

This might also be science. Or maybe it’s engineering. I don’t know. It’s machines.

This guy is looking at the things, maybe liquids or gasses.

She is noticing how the thing has changed and is about to take notes on her hypothesis.

More bubble things. Too late to switch careers now, Bud. At least you have at lots of keys.

More liquid things and jars and gravity.

Maybe this is chemistry.

And finally, badda bing, badda boom, vaccines, fresh from the icebox.