1970s, Art, Beauty, Culture, Fashion, Food, Fun, Funny, History, Nostalgia, Photography, Pics, Style, Vintage

Property Of The Banana

Documerica: National Archives

This gal throws much attitude, but I honestly can’t tell if she’s 13 or 23. Huge Jackie O sunglasses, permed bob, lip gloss, tight waist. Love it! While her shirt cuffs are reminiscent of my own tees in 1985, this was actually September of 1975, exactly 45 years ago. That was the year emissions testing on the exhaust analyzer went into effect, and she was watching her go through testing at an inspection station in Cincinnati, Ohio.

What I don’t get is the possessive S after banana. Is the world going bananas? Sure, that’s solid. But banana’s? Certainly it doesn’t own her. She looks like the boss of herself.

Food, Nature, Photography, Pics

At Least Somebody’s Enjoying Them

Truth be told, I’m all figged out, my friends. If I skip a day of figpicking, the birds and bees will devour them.

This is what I see when I get up under the tree.

And this is what I see when I come out from under the tree, looking up through the cottonweed tree.

Some of the leaves appear to have been chomped on by caterpillars. But no matter.

Cottonwood leaves still make the BEST swishing sound when the wind blows through them.

Food, Fun, Nature, Photography, Pics, Texas

Folks Should Call Me Miss Figgy At This Point

As some of you know, our fig tree (a cutting from my husband’s grandfather’s tree many moons ago) flaunts her fecundity each June, and then promptly closes shop within the month. This year, she held on to her small green figs until the very end of June, when they plumped up all purple and big as softballs, in some cases.

As soon as you twist one off a branch, a sticky milk spurts out, and it’s quite itchy. Even three rounds of vigorous Soft Soap won’t make it go entirely away. Nature’s weapon.

This was Thursday morning’s haul.

I’m always surprised by how few people have ever eaten a ripe fig, but it makes sense, since you never see them in the stores. They die after 48 hours, so you have to eat them quickly. As neither my son nor my spouse are fans, I have had to force myself to eat 3-5 figs daily, just to fulfill the chintzy gal inside me, who cannot pass up free food. Plus, it’s healthy!

Sometimes I have to add them to a salad, so I don’t get so bored.

I gave a bushel to a Facebook friend, who sees me post them daily, and tried to offer some to the new Asian family across the street, but he thought I was asking him to come trim my tree. Eventually, I spoke with the wife, who was happy to try some, and I packed a dozen in a to-go box for them. Another 10 were given next door to our Indian neighbors, who thought at first we were offering “pigs”¬† last year. They said they didn’t eat meat and politely declined. But once we got past the consonant confusion, they were down with a pile of figs.

Lastly, the neighbors behind us actually can see the purple orbs as they hover on branches above our fence. We told them to snag whatever they like, since the abundance is overwhelming, and I packed up another box for them and passed it over. It will be 107 today, and zero chance of rain, as usual, so I don’t know how long this tree will keep pumping them out. But until then, I’ll keep reaching for the figs (except the top branches; those are for the birds and squirrels).

 

1940s, Culture, Food, Funny, History, Nostalgia, Photography, Pics, Vintage

When Only The Finest Organ-Shaped French Saint Legumes Will Do

Have you eaten Joan of Arc brands in your neck of the woods? It must be a geographical item, as I’ve never seen such a thing.

“The Good Old Days” by Time Life

I don’t envy grocers nowadays, trying to keep their stores clean, their employees healthy, and their shelves stocked. But the lean WWII years also challenged grocers with government rationing lists. Here, this grocer attempts to label his stock with an accurate price in points. Can you imagine?

http://gdonna.com/

Housewives had to be thrifty, sometimes to the point of excess.

It was important to keep a sense of humor about the whole thing, as it is today.

Austin, Culture, Food, History, Nostalgia, Photography, Pics, Texas

I Want Strangers To Feed Me Again

Houston 175, James Coney Island on Walker Avenue, Houston

It’s a darn good thing I know how to cook, since I’ve had to cook 98% of our meals over these past nine weeks. My first thoughts in the morning are, “Take Bayer aspirin, give dog his pill, make coffee, thaw meat.” Meal prep is, as Willie Nelson sang, always on my mind. Manana in Texas means bars, yes, BARS, will open. Restaurants have already been plugging away at 25%, at least those that have not yet folded. A handful of iconic Austin restaurants operating for over 30 years each, have died a COVID death. Tomorrow, restaurants can allow 50% occupancy. And no, they will not shove blow-up sex dolls in booths to establish social distancing like a certain establishment in South Carolina did…

twitter

Austin is known for keeping it weird, but that’s hella weird. Crazy weird. And yet, when I think of the flaky dim bulb brains of many hostesses I’ve known, it’s probably helpful, so they wouldn’t seat those tables. Nice touch with the bowls and forks.

1930s, Advertising, Art, Culture, Food, Funny, History, Humor, Nostalgia, Vintage

Chocolates Or I Shoot You: Accurate Depiction Of Motherhood

May 1932

Oft is the time I’ve enjoyed a Whitman’s Sampler; Walgreen’s always has them in supply. But what of this metal box of Loveliness? Isn’t that a fruit of the spirit? No, I forget myself. Loveliness is full of surprise centers. Forrest Gump’s mother was well-acquainted with these. I received neither last Sunday. But at least I’m not stuck on a frontier with my frock stuck in a cactus.

1940s, Culture, Food, History, Nostalgia, Photography, Pics, Texas, Vintage

Howdy, Y’all

Just a note to say howdy from one of the states that is now allowing 25% capacity dining.

1948 Ventana

We didn’t take our chances with that risk today, and continued instead with carryout, per our usual Saturday order, wore masks, held the containers swathed in a towel as we drove home, got home, threw the towel in the wash, switched all containers to our plates, then popped them in the oven at 200 degrees for 10 minutes, wiped down the counter where containers had made contact, washed our hands, and badda-bing, badda-boom, lunch. How about y’all? Eating out yet?

1960s, Food, History, Nostalgia, Photography, Pics, Texas, Vintage

JFK’s Last Evening Spent In Awkward Company Of Mariachis

Houston Chronicle

November 21, 1963

Rice Hotel in Houston, Texas

Jackie and Jack, Lady Bird and LBJ attending a LULAC (League of United Latin-American Citizens ) function

 

Anyone else feel awkward when the mariachi band comes by? You smile and nod when they sidle up beside your table, but of course you can’t sing along. You don’t want to eat while they’re playing, or resume conversation with your guests because that would be rude, so you smile and wait it out. Should you tip? How would you even tip when their hands are full? I’m trying to eat Combo #4. Please move along. I’ll enjoy it more when you’re 10 feet away.

Aguilas de Oro playing at Los Agaves in South Charleston by Chris Dorst/Gazette-Mail
1930s, Culture, Food, Fun, History, Nature, Nostalgia, Photography, Pics, Vintage

Wild Rice Is Life

Nat Geo 3/35, Finlay Photograph by Clifton Adams

Four incredibly color-coordinated pale faces chat about patterns with Chippewa Chief Big Bear in Itasca Park, Minnesota back in 1935. His tribesman sold many items to visitors, including beaded bags, baskets, toy birch-bark canoes, and other handicrafts. They also held husking parties, such as these,¬†with the intent to supply rice for sportsmen’s game banquets.

Asabel Curtis

While other tribes chose corn as their main crop, the Chippewa lived in a “place where there is food upon the water” surrounding the Great Lakes region. Wild rice, or “manoomin” in the Ojibwe language, was integral to their diets as well as their entire way of life. Wisconsin Chippewans have harvested manoomin for centuries.

https://www.sierraclub.org/

In 2018, Chippewa Indians from Turtle Lake, Wisconsin continued to gather in the name of rice, hosting their 45th annual Wild Rice Festival. The pow-wow was the showstopper.

https://www.hometownsource.com/

While rice beds have been diminishing, threatened by climate issues, pipelines, and mines, Chippewans struggle to protect the crop by reseeding lakes and waterways, hoping to meet the needs of their communities as well as pass on the culture to younger generations.

https://www.sierraclub.org/

Who knew wild rice was such a big deal? To most of us, it’s just a side option at restaurants.

Or a delectable holiday dish, such as this cranberry squash wild rice pilaf.

https://carlsbadcravings.com/

Seriously, I could eat that right now.

Check and see if your state celebrates wild rice as well. Why, we even have a Texas Wild Rice Festival in San Marcos! There’s the mayor floating the river in the middle of the festival.

Prices seem fair in most places, even if you don’t get a pow-wow or float down a river.

And don’t forget to dress up!

Deer River Rice Festival, Grand Rapids Herald Review by Don Batista
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