1940s, Culture, Fun, Funny, History, Humor, Nostalgia, Photography, Pics, Vintage

Santa Packs On Pounds During Quarantine: Must Prepare For Countdown To Christmas

1947 Blue Print

Like many of us, Santa has spent the last six months confined to his ornate mansion with elves/servants to meet his many needs. As a member of a high risk population, he made the wise decision to not leave his estate. However, his eating habits suffered, and consequently, he “shakes when he laughs like a bowl full of jelly” more than ever before. With autumn’s arrival today, sources say he is focusing on tightening his core, to meet his Christmas Eve duties of navigating a sleigh and climbing in and out of chimneys. Word on the street is he tried both Tae Bo and P90X and found them too taxing. He has now taken to old VHS cassettes of “Sweating to the Oldies.” As of this writing, his shape is somewhat uneven.

But don’t fret for Mr. Claus; he’s been in the game for hundreds of years now, and he still has that Santa Swag that woos the ladies. The cap hides any receding hairline, and his red suit means he’s always soft to the touch.

Nonetheless, Santa is making his health a priority with heart-healthy veggies and lean meats. Don’t be surprised if you spot him at the North Pole 24 Fitness.

https://www.askmen.com/
1950s, Austin, College, Fun, History, Nostalgia, Photography, Pics, Style, Texas, Vintage

That Classic Christmas Piñata

all images from 1955 Cactus

Even living in Texas, I’ve never heard of hitting a piñata for Christmas. One might lose the bat (or cane, as it were) and fling it into the Christmas tree, making it a holiday to remember.

Today’s images are all Christmas scenes from dorm life at the University of Texas in 1955. Some images were inaccurately labeled, like this one.

Not everyone. Not Carol.

These Spooks don’t seem to be haunting anything.

This girl seems horrified by her friend’s decoration. Thankfully, Santa is supervising.

We see scenes of tree trimming and wrapping paper cutting.

Men topping a diminutive tree.

Late night gift exchanges.

Ah, the excitement of the first tear!

1940s, Advertising, Art, Culture, Fun, History, Nostalgia, Pics, Vintage

The Font That Gives Me The Heebeejeebees

I don’t know what it is about that font, but I don’t cotton to it. It’s not Nordic or Viking, but there’s something very anti-American about it, believe me. I can see why they chose it; it looks like holly leaves, sure enough. But no me gusta.

Today, we’ll be checking out more Christmas gift ideas from 1949. Yes, 70 years ago! Yes, another Christmas post! Only FOUR MORE DAYS!!

giphy.com

That’s right, Frank! And it’s time for indulging impatience with a new Polaroid camera! Don’t wait a week to have your film developed; get a chemical-smelly, low-res image NOW! You can see the actual size!

But maybe you don’t have a Polaroid. Maybe you have a real camera that needs a real exposure meter. Isn’t it cute–like a l’il Fitbit?

You could upgrade from still photos to moving pictures with a Bell & Howell camera. Is it me, or do the “hilarious Christmas moments” below seem poor choices?

If cameras weren’t your bag, you could gift a pen. Folks used to use pens a lot. For writing letters. And doing accounting stuff. And writing out checks. Now we just use them to sign forms. But Esterbrook gave you all kinds of tip options. Fun!

However, Parker claimed they made the world’s most wanted gift pen. The case looks as snazzy and cozy as a coffin. And no, it wasn’t 1951 yet.

All these gifts sound to mainstream? Too predictable? Well, you could always give your family the gift of Vitamin D and melanoma with a trip to warm places. No self-respecting Hallmark movie would host Christmas in Arizona or California, but if it’s swim trunks and palm trees you desire, wrap some tickets to paradise and stick a bow on them! And whatever you do, Merry Christmas!

1940s, Advertising, Art, Culture, Fun, History, Nostalgia, Pics, Vintage

Santas Of 1949

Before we lived in a culture where some believed that asking your child to sit in Santa’s lap was a violation of personal rights, kids would line up at department stores to sit in the lap of jolly old Saint Nick and tell him what they wanted for Christmas, without having parents looming within earshot. The little boy in this Plymouth ad definitely has his dad’s back.

Let’s keep in mind that Coca-Cola had only decided what the now-iconic Santa should look like back in 1933, so tweaks were still being made. This Santa hat looks more like a jester cap. How fun is that squiggle of a holly detail?

Next, we have a very basic Santa rendering. He looks like might be about to sneeze, but he’s pointing to the gift of Leica, which should be at the top of your list.

Lastly, we have a rotund and active Santa (no sitting for him!). Fluffy beard? Check! Rosy cheeks? Check! Proper hat? Check! He appears to be unveiling a new fleet of trains.

So if you grew up watching Santa animation and cartoons…

giphy.com

…and got older and decided it was impossible for him to travel from chimney to chimney…

…just know that some of us still believe.

 

1930s, Advertising, Art, College, Culture, Fun, History, Nostalgia, Pics, Vintage

Jayhawker Christmas 1935

Today’s images come from the pages of my grandpa’s December 1935 Jayhawker, from the University of Kansas. As you can see, the colors are still bright. The December issue was littered with ads for the holidays.

Home movies were the bee’s knees. Just remember that “in after years such scenes of the past should be priceless.” Sounds like Engrish. Also, do any of you have any home movies from 1935? We have zero zilch nada home movies of any kind.

In this Carl’s ad for “good clothes,” Santa is shown as morbidly obese, and his sack of toys actually balances out his belly, making perfect spinal alignment.

In this Jones’ ad, we can see inside a clothing store in 1935. Seems organized but sparse. Then again, they did carry Faultless NoBelt Pajamas.

Included in the pages were disturbing cartoons like this one.

If your wallet was fat in those Depression-era days, you might hit the Kansas City Auto Show and snag yourself a shiny Studebaker.

But if all you had was change in your pocket, you could still pick up a carton of Chesterfield’s. It’s what Rudolph would have wanted.