Chevro-Lay On Top Of Me Because That’s Normal

I guess I don’t get the artistic vision of this ad. To me, I see a car unable to simply cross a shallow stream, a driver who has abandoned his vehicle, and a half-naked woman pressed against the windshield, foot whimsically in the air, brick at her side.

Of course, that’s sexist. SHE could have very well been the driver when the LSD kicked in. She drove right into a creek. She took her clothes off. She got on top of the car to get a better view of the melting dancing hippos inside. But the brick? I don’t get it.

July 1959, Bel Air 2 door sedan

Whom To Hail

Citizens of Denton, Texas had several choices when it came to cabs in the 1940s. The men below were all licensed taxi drivers for City Cab.

They could even carry your luggage for you.

Dixie Cabs had the recognizable logo on the side. All you had to do was pick up the phone and dial 45 for service. 

For a more rugged crew, you might consider the fellows at 2100 Cab, right next to the Sinclair station. They kept their fleet shiny.

Happy cabbing!

Orange You Glad You’re Not A Wicker-Weaver?

Famagustan orange baskets make their way to Livadhia, where hopefully, a wicker market exists.

Nat Geo July 1928

Main Street has yet to be paved, and the donkeys tire easily.

The goats, however, are doing just fine, thank you very much.

If oranges prove to be in short supply in Livadhia, the baskets can be used for other things.

What could go wrong?

Real Life Large Marge

Nat Geo Jan/88

Toots Holzheimer knew her rig inside and out. After 20 years of hauling “anything and everything” more than 1.6 million kilometers over the outback of northern Queensland–and raising eight kids, she passed away in 1992. A crane unloading pylons at a wharf lost control, and she was struck by its load.

Hardworking and tough, she tackled the hurdles of remote freight transportation, including lifting full 44 gallon drums. Her truck, Toot’s Old Girl, is on display at the Winton Diamantina Truck Museum.

But come on. She does look a wee bit like Large Marge, no?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

giphy.com

Gas Envy

1935 Texaco ad

In 1932, Texaco introduced Fire Chief gasoline to the nation, a “super-octane” motor fuel touted, as you can see above, as “surpassing specifications” for ¬†emergency vehicles. Ed Wynn promoted it on his NBC radio program called the Texaco Fire Chief.

Amazon

Alcoa Aluminum

Adios, needless weight! This ad may be from September of 1935, but it still shines brightly on the page. In fact, you can see how the silver reflects light off the page, all these 84 years later.

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