Orange You Glad You’re Not A Wicker-Weaver?

Famagustan orange baskets make their way to Livadhia, where hopefully, a wicker market exists.

Nat Geo July 1928

Main Street has yet to be paved, and the donkeys tire easily.

The goats, however, are doing just fine, thank you very much.

If oranges prove to be in short supply in Livadhia, the baskets can be used for other things.

What could go wrong?

Real Life Large Marge

Nat Geo Jan/88

Toots Holzheimer knew her rig inside and out. After 20 years of hauling “anything and everything” more than 1.6 million kilometers over the outback of northern Queensland–and raising eight kids, she passed away in 1992. A crane unloading pylons at a wharf lost control, and she was struck by its load.

Hardworking and tough, she tackled the hurdles of remote freight transportation, including lifting full 44 gallon drums. Her truck, Toot’s Old Girl, is on display at the Winton Diamantina Truck Museum.

But come on. She does look a wee bit like Large Marge, no?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

giphy.com

Gas Envy

1935 Texaco ad

In 1932, Texaco introduced Fire Chief gasoline to the nation, a “super-octane” motor fuel touted, as you can see above, as “surpassing specifications” for ¬†emergency vehicles. Ed Wynn promoted it on his NBC radio program called the Texaco Fire Chief.

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Alcoa Aluminum

Adios, needless weight! This ad may be from September of 1935, but it still shines brightly on the page. In fact, you can see how the silver reflects light off the page, all these 84 years later.

Civil War Bridge On The Pamunkey

US Signal Corps Photo (Brady Collection) in National Archives
US Signal Corps Photo (Brady Collection) in National Archives

In The American Heritage History of American Railroads by Jensen, this 1862 image shows a bridge under construction. Major General George McClellan of the Union Army brought locomotives and cars by ship from Baltimore and ran trains as close to four miles to the Confederate capital. The workmen are seated, and to the left is a photographer’s field darkroom. At that time, photographs had to be developed immediately and while wet.

To their left , a locomotive was arriving on a ship in White House Landing on the Pamunkey River.

railroadsinamerica016

Here is another image of the field darkroom, invented by Matthew Brady.

http://www.sonofthesouth.net/
http://www.sonofthesouth.net/

The wagon would carry the chemicals, glass plates, and finished negatives. Can you imagine what would have happened if the horses got startled or took off at a gallop?

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