The Stunning Social Life Of Expressionless Darrell Mathes

Standard

Sunday morning begins with a pipe and the funny papers. Darrell can hardly contain his laughter.

all photos by Mike Gubar

all photos by Mike Gubar

On Monday, he studies Child Psychology at the Theta House, thrilled to be in the company of two lovely dames. Darrell takes Darrell very seriously.

let's hope that's a printing error

let’s hope that’s a printing error on her cheek

Later in the week, he and Peggy hit the bowling alley. She watches, suspicious as to how a robot is able to record her strike with human handwriting.

JayhawkerCom43-006

Finally, the weekend arrives! Time for a night on the town, dancing his cares away.

JayhawkerCom43-008Paula feels victorious in that he has agreed to hold her hand. Both are over the moon.

Irrepressible Imogene Coca

Standard

Originally posted on The Blog of Funny Names:

Wacky Imogene Coca (1908-2001) may be best remembered for playing opposite Sid Caesar in Your Show of Shows, which ran Saturday nights on NBC from 1950 to 1954. However, folks under 60 may remember her as Aunt Jenny on The Brady Bunch or the patently annoying Aunt Edna on the cinematic triumph, National Lampoon’s Vacation.

edna

Originally deemed Emogeane, she was born in Philadelphia to José Fernandez de Coca, a violinist and vaudeville band leader, and Sadie Brady Coca, a dancer who also performed in a magician’s act. SADIE BRADY COCA. Awesome.

“I began as one of those horrible little children who sing with no voice,” Coca said of her early training. By the time she was 13, however, she found herself tap dancing, somersaulting, and dancing ballet. She got her first job in the chorus of the Broadway musical When You Smile, and later went on to win the second-ever Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding…

View original 332 more words

Bridge Under Covered Wagon

Standard

CoveredWagon

I have a pretty good eye for determining 20th Century decades, based on clothing and hairstyle. But this picture that I purchased had no details, and I can’t even venture a guess as to whether it’s the late 1800s or early 1900s. Anyone able to tell by the hats and uniforms where or when this might be?