Making Merry Music

In the fall of 1947, the Jawhawker published its seasonal magazine, full of pictures of musical students on campus at the University of Kansas. Here we see trumpet major Dorothy Brewer (from Olathe) showing us what she’s got.

But she wasn’t the only one.

Horns were in fashion.

But the piano never went out of style. Old mentored young.

The ladies of Miller Hall gathered to tickle the ivories during this late night pajama party.

These days, however, they may look more like this.

giphy.com

Jayhawker Life, April 1936, Part II

Yesterday, we looked at the life of a University of Kansas Jayhawk in the spring of 1936. Today, we start with scenes from their social life.

Students bought tickets for Carnival Town.

It was an indoor affair.

Lucky Millinder provided the music.

There were sideshow acts as well.

The students loved costume parties.

And sports were taken seriously.

The ladies below were the junior queens of the annual prom. As you can see, this was a “bare forehead” time in hairstyling.

I also wanted to share some of the ads in the back of the magazine, for the artwork as well as the three-digit phone numbers.

And how about that cute little image at the bottom right? Keep in step! Everyone knows ice cream is healthy!

Jayhawker Life, April 1936, Part I

Though we don’t think of 1936 as a particularly hopeful, happy year in American history, the students at the University of Kansas seemed to be doing just fine.

Interesting jazzy artwork, no? Costume parties, bicycles built for two…

Roller skating, swimming, snowmen, shooting, wrestling, and a toucan that is in no way a jayhawk, their mythical mascot. The name is a combination of two birds — the noisy blue jay, known to rob nests, and the sparrow hawk, a stealthy hunter.

The typical hazing took place.

The ladies of the YWCA posed for this portrait.

I found this an odd item to place in a university magazine. What say you?

Raymond’s Drugstore 1898

 

from "Hometown USA"

from “Hometown USA”

Clerks at this Lawrence, Kansas drugstore hammed it up at the soda fountain 117 years ago. Up high, you can see the fruit flavors listed. They were dispensed to the right, out of the “papier-mache grotto.” Weird, right? Patent medicines lined the shelves, including Dr. Pierce’s Golden Medical Discovery, “the idea spring tonic and blood purifier.” And I’d love to know what that little bird statue is for.