Late Stage Civil War Veterans

Confederate veterans from the Civil War at Camp Ben McCullough, by Neal Douglass, August 8th, 1940

Bad Spot For A Reunion

French soldiers marching past a shelled village near Verdun in May 1940, after German breakthrough at Sedan, by Carl Mydans

Beer Drinkers Prefer Pitcher Of Ways & Means To Hoppy IPA’s This Winter

In this image from a February 1941 LIFE, the original Joseph Patrick Kennedy Sr chooses to stay hydrated during a meeting of the House of Representatives. At the time, he was serving as the United States Ambassador to the United Kingdom. During the Battle of Britain in November 1940, a pessimistic Kennedy expressed concern that “Democracy is finished in England,” which annoyed President Roosevelt. Not only would it prove untrue, but it contradicted sentiment by Churchill, who notoriously stated, “Never never never give up.” By the time this picture was published, Kennedy had resigned his position.

H.R. 1776 was also known as the Lend-Lease Act. Per visitthecapitol.gov:

In 1941 Congress passed a bill allowing the president to provide assistance to nations whose defense was considered vital to the security of the United States. Known as the Lend-Lease Act, it became the principal means for providing U.S. aid to key Americans allies, especially Great Britain, during World War II. The act permitted the president to “loan” war materiel such as ammunition, tanks, and airplanes to allies without expectation of repayment. Though the United States would not declare war until December 8, 1941, the Lend-Lease Act effectively ended U.S. neutrality.

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When You’re SERIOUS About Christmas Cards

LIFE: Our Finest Hour

Actually, this woman was a draft service worker during WWII. Men 18-65 and were required to register and keep the card on them at all times. Men age 18-45 were subject to military service. From 1940 until 1947 – when the wartime selective service act expired – over 10,000,000 men were inducted.

(c) Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association, Deerfield MA.

This cartoon in the Saturday Evening Post depicted a draft board scraping the bottom of the barrel.

Mischa Richter; February 19, 1944

A Very Good Find In A Very Tough Year

Life: Our Finest Hour

During WWII, the not-yet-vanquished German army occupied the north of France, including the port of Cherbourg, which they heavily fortified against seaborne assault. As the only deep water port in the region, it was particularly desirable, so American troops encircled the city in June of 1944 in the Battle of Cherbourg, and handed the Germans their asses five days later, when they surrendered. The fighting left the city in a compromised state. However, in only a month, cargo ships known as Liberty Ships began to arrive, and it became the busiest port in the entire world, with twice the traffic of New York, until the war ended. It has since merged with an adjacent city to become Cherbourg-Octeville.* In this image, we see American soldiers in Cherbourg who appear to have stumbled upon some German wine stores. I’ll drink to that.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*per wikipedia

 

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