1940s, Culture, Fashion, Fun, History, Humor, Nostalgia, Photography, Pics, Style, Vintage

Hot Off The Press: Fake News

1962 Silver Spruce

This all seems fishy. Let’s print it!

Networks don’t care about accuracy. They want ratings. Unity doesn’t get viewers. So why not flat-out tell lies, “change the narrative,” incite violence and unrest, and frighten folks with the scariest topics we can find. Corona! Lockdown! Second wave! Riots! Wildfires! Floods! Division! Your neighbor hates you and always has! The economy is sinking! What about your 401K? And all this followed by that incessant Boy Scout rape commercial that lasts about four minutes. Wouldn’t it be nice to watch a Good News network? Journalists, tell us something positive!

1948 Ventana

Let’s call the editor and give her a piece of what for.

1947 Yucca

What’s that? A march for hope and joy? People lining the streets with smiles on their faces? What’s that? We have more in common with each other than what separates us?

Sure, 2020 sucks. No doubt about it. And it does seem to be getting worse–and getting better and getting worse.Β  But, hey, you and I are still alive to blog. Most of us probably even had the virus by now. But, wait! You’ll have everlasting side effects that destroy your health! Maybe, but life is a crapshoot. Any day we wake up is a gift. No guarantees.

At least we can still spin some vinyl.

We can still dance, if only with one partner, or even by ourselves.

We can still buy hats–or even masks that reflect our political, religious, or social ideologies–if that floats your boat.

We can nap and read periodicals.

We can still drive.

And most of us can still eat out.

And guess what? When the holiday season starts in one month, we can start wearing festive Christmas sweaters again.

Who can be sad with reindeer on their chests?

So just remember, it’s okay to relate to this.

But don’t forget this:

11 thoughts on “Hot Off The Press: Fake News”

  1. When I started my journalism career in the wayback, Kerbey, our college newspaper/radio stations got the national news from wire service machines that looked exactly like the one you pictured. One from the Associated Press and the other from United Press International. Reporters from AP and UPI raced to get it first and get it right, teaching this student a lesson about news and reporting.
    All these decades later and downsized from the big daily a while now, I still defend the hard workers of the media who are out there attempting to make sure we know what’s going on in our world despite how much the current Twitterer in Chief says everything but his view is fake.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That is so cool that you have that memory. I think the news is misleading from every political side. And once you start digging, you realize you are not being told the truth many times. Especially when you see all those side by sides, where so many newscasts say the same exact thing verbatim, it is really creepy. They are all being fed identical scripts. I sure hope there are good folks out there dedicated to shining the light on truth, no matter which side, but everything is so polarized and made to shock and scare now. The media has so much power and it seems to serve them well to watch the world crumble. I would really like to believe in the good of people but we rarely see that.

      Like

      1. I was one of those people, a newspaper/news site journalist, for the bulk of my career, Kerbey, and what we in our newsroom sought to share was the truth from the mouths of our sources, to serve our community. I have to live by that knowledge.

        Liked by 1 person

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