Is This My Cowardly Lion?

It’s not often that I get to say “I’m too young to remember this,” but since I wasn’t alive in the 60s–hey, I’m too young. I was flipping through my 1967 LIFE and saw this image of Bert Lahr.

It didn’t make me want to eat Lay’s. It didn’t make me want to wear a blackjack dealer visor. Instead, it raised red flags.

  1. That’s unhygienic to stack chips on a table (and nearly impossible).
  2. We all know each chip bag contains precisely 14 chips, not dozens.
  3. Bert looks uncomfortable, like he’s wincing through back pain. In fact, he DID die later that year, in December.

If you’re over 55, you may recall this ad. It’s chock full of everything that makes people cringe these days, and I don’t mean the minimalist background. Racism and poor acting and stealing, oh my!

I’ll choose to remember him as the Cowardly Lion, and not as the Lay’s pitchman. RIP.

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6 thoughts on “Is This My Cowardly Lion?”

  1. I remember it well. I think they spent about $8.45 on producing that masterpiece. Contrast with the ads that run for the super bowl. Heap biggum budgets. Funny thing, I don’t think the huge ad budgets of today necessarily sell more potato chips.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I have complete faith that no more than $8.45 was spent. And I agree that over a million for a spot is crazy talk. Oh, now I’m just now getting the connection between a dealer having chips and him eating chips. Wow, super blonde moment.

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  2. Again with the hysterical. You are just knocking them all down, Kerbey! (bowling metaphor to say you’re batting 1000 but if I have to explain it then it’s stupid to use it) My point: you done good. Again. How did you find the tv ad?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We should go bowling today, Liz. I’ll pencil you in at 11am. I should be done shopping by then. Okay, so I saw that ad in my LIFE, and I was like what? So I googled Bert Lahr Lay’s to see if that really was a thing, and lo and behold, there was the video. Bless his heart.

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